Cape Coral is a vibrant and friendly community with all the beauty that you expect from Southwest Florida. With over 400 miles of canals boating, fishing and water sports are a significant enhancement to our quality of life. It borders Punta Gorda to the north, Pine Island to the west and North Fort Myers to the east.

Cape Coral is made up of 114 square miles of land and is the largest city in Southwest Florida and the largest between Tampa and Miami. With golf courses, tennis courts, boat ramps, athletic parks, natural preserves and more, the quality of life in Cape Coral is second to none.

Cape Coral has one of the best recreation departments in the state, providing all kinds of services for young and old. Cape Coral consistently ranks at the top for public safety in both Florida and the United States. Cape Coral economic growth and educational system, combined with our top public safety standing, make Cape Coral one of the most desirable locations in the entire world. Read more about Cape Coral, Florida >>


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Cape Coral – Welcome to Your Relocation Destination

Sunny South Florida has long been a destination for people looking to escape the bitter winters and urban sprawl of the North. Since the mid-1950s the Sunshine State has welcomed everyone from retirees to entrepreneurs, from growing families to young newlyweds. Some come for the sunshine, some for the ample business opportunities. But everyone stays for the laid back atmosphere.

Located on the state’s sunny Gulf Coast, and snugly nestled beside the rolling Caloosahatchee River, you’ll find one of Southwest Florida’s best-kept secrets – Cape Coral. If you have been searching for an enticing relocation destination for you and your family you’d be hard pressed to find a more welcoming city than Cape Coral, Florida.

A Brief History of the Cape

In 1957 two brothers left their Baltimore home and headed for sunny South Florida. Leonard and Jack Rosen were searching for an opportunity. The brothers chartered a plane and spent two weeks scouring the Southwest Florida landscape searching for land to develop. When they finally landed in what is now Cape Coral they knew they had found exactly what they had been looking for.

The Rosen brothers soon purchased the 103 square-mile tract of land, then known as Redfish Point, and began the development of their master-planned city. Of course, not even Rome was built in a day, and it would take some time before Cape Coral truly began to take shape. But it wouldn’t be long before Redfish Point became the Cape Coral Floridians have come to love.

A Master-Planned City Takes Shape

Throughout 1958 and 1959 the Rosen Brothers enticed investors and residents to their newfound community. Commercial and residential buildings were being built, 80 miles of roads were under construction, and more than 150 miles of canals were mapped out, dredged and dug. Fun fact: Cape Coral currently has more square miles of navigable canals than any other city in the world – and that includes Venice, Italy.

By 1963 the nascent city’s population had grown to just under 3000 people. In 1964 the Cape Coral Bridge was built over the Caloosahatchee River, connecting the Cape with its sister city Fort Myers. The opening of the Cape Coral Bridge firmly established the Cape as an integral part of Lee County. Cape Coral formally incorporated in 1970 and remains one of the fastest growing cities in the country. Today, the once fledgling city of Redfish Point is home to more than 190,000 residents.

Cape Coral Offers a Unique Mix of Both Traditional and Modern Aesthetics

Every city in the country likes to lay claim to being a beautiful place to live and a wonderful place to bring up a family. Only a few, however, can truly live up to its boast.

From its earliest days as Redfish Point the city of Cape Coral has been influenced by Southwest Florida’s colonial heritage. Spanish and Mediterranean bungalows and ranch houses maintain the city’s small town aesthetic. But don’t let that small town vibe deceive you. Cape Coral is a bustling modern city, as evidenced by the sleek modern homes and businesses that sit comfortably amongst their more romantic neighbors. This easy juxtaposition of the traditional with the modern gives Cape Coral its unique architectural flavor.

But that only covers the Cape’s man-made beauty. When it comes to Southwest Florida, Mother Nature is the real star, and Cape Coral has plenty of natural wonders with which to woo visitors and new residents alike.

Cape Coral’s Natural Beauty Will Win Your Heart

Cape Coral, like so much of the Gulf Coast, benefits from its proximity to a tropical savanna climate. The abundant Florida sunshine (over 350 sunny days a year) and ample rainfall (average of 56 inches per annum) feeds the lush green lawns and flowering fields that blanket the city’s residential and commercial areas. Palms, cypress and mangrove trees combine to create an exotic backdrop for the relaxed lifestyle that has come to define Southwest Florida.

Of course, all of that sunshine does bring the heat. Summers in the Cape can be hot and humid. But the winters more than make up for it with their milder temperatures and clear blue skies. If you love the outdoors Southwest Florida’s climate will give you ample opportunity to explore the wilds and wonders of your new hometown.

Water, Water Everywhere

Cape Coral, and its sister city Fort Myers, may have grown considerably over the years but they retain their seaside charms. The Cape has over 400 miles of navigable waterways that provide ample access to the Gulf of Mexico, the Caloosahatchee River, and even far-off Lake Okeechobee. If you love boating and fishing you’ll be spoiled for choice living in the Cape.

But the Cape’s natural attractions aren’t limited to bodies of water. Living in Southwest Florida gives you easy access to some of the world’s most impressive outdoor attractions. Koreshan State Park, Lover’s Key, and Manatee Park give locals and visitors the chance to experience Florida’s natural wonders first hand. The Cape can even boast of having one of the largest nature preserves in the South – the 365-acre Four Mile Cove Ecological Preserve.

Whether it’s water sports or outdoor adventuring there’s plenty to tempt you and your family in sunny Cape Coral.

Cape Coral is an Affordable Relocation Destination

There’s plenty to love about Cape Coral. It’s a growing city with a vibrant economy and a wealth of local attractions. But how does it stack up when it comes to quality of life and cost of living? After all, sooner or later you have to crunch some numbers and consider the bottom line.

  • Cape Coral is the fifth most affordable place to live in Florida.
  • The median household income is $57,125 (a 6.4% rise over the last 3 years).
  • The median age in Cape Coral is 46 yrs old.
  • The average home price is $231K (on par with the US national average).
  • The unemployment rate is 5.5% (slightly above the national average).
  • Cape Coral has a strong job market with a ten year predicted growth of 41.0% (8 points above the national average).
  • Cost of living for Cape Coral’s residents is 4% above the national average.

As you can see, Cape Coral is one of the most affordable places to live in Southwest Florida. While the overall cost of living may tip slightly above the national average it’s worth pointing out that Florida has no state income tax. Let that sink in for a moment – no state income tax.

Cape Coral Welcomes Families

There was a time when the Sunshine State was synonymous with retirees. That was never really accurate, but it’s even more off the mark today. Florida is a great place to bring up a family. In addition to the abundance of healthy outdoor activities and the low cost of living the state has consistently ranked best in education when compared to the national average.

Cape Coral is part of the Lee County School District. There are 27 public schools in The Cape serving upwards of 25,000 students. The Cape is home to some of the highest-ranking schools in Florida, including Oasis Charter Elementary, Trafalgar Middle School and Cape Coral High School.

Florida also has some of the lowest in-state tuition costs for college and university, well below the national average. The state has 28 community colleges and four-year universities, providing plenty of options for students moving on from high school after graduation. And with the low cost of in-state tuition parents can breathe a little easier when it comes time to send the kids off to university.

So What Are You Waiting For? Move On Down to Cape Coral, Florida!

There are plenty of good reasons to move to Cape Coral, Florida. Between the low cost of living, top ranked schools, and abundance of outdoor activities everyone can find something to love about this big little city.

New lots and existing homes are hitting the market every day, with price points to fit every budget. Whether you’re looking to relocate for business or retirement, are starting a family or moving the whole clan, Cape Coral may be just the relocation destination you’ve been searching for.